Diagnosis of Avian Mycoplasmas: A Comparison between PCR and Culture Technique

AUTHORS

F. Muhammad 1 , 2 , * , J. Hussain 1 , S. K. Fareed 1 , T. Ahmad Khan 3 , S. Ahmad Khan 1 , 4 , A. Ahmad 1 , 4

1 Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, University of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan

2 Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Life Sciences & Informatics Balochistan University of IT, Engineering & Management Sciences (BUITEMS), Quetta Takkatu Campus, Airport road Quetta, Balochistan, Pakistan

3 Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, University of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan

4 Department of Biosciences, Faculty of Science, Barrett Hodgson University, Karachi, Pakistan

How to Cite: Muhammad F, Hussain J, Fareed S K, Ahmad Khan T, Ahmad Khan S, et al. Diagnosis of Avian Mycoplasmas: A Comparison between PCR and Culture Technique, Arch Razi Inst. 2018 ; 73(3):e84914. doi: 10.22092/ari.2017.108217.1085.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Archives of Razi Institute: 73 (3); 239-244
Published Online: September 01, 2018
Article Type: Observational Study
Received: November 10, 2016
Accepted: May 27, 2017
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Abstract

Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae are the causative agents of avian mycoplasmosis in commercial poultry. Among the available tools, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and culture are confirmatory tools for the diagnosis of mycoplasmosis after the initial serological screening of suspected birds. Overall, 181 samples were analyzed, 152 (84%) and 103 (57%) of which were found positive by PCR and culture, respectively. Further, 54 (92%) broiler samples were found positive for general avian mycoplasma. Among the total positive samples, MS positivity was as high as 72 (47%) by PCR, while it was 45 (44%) by culture. MG positivity was 23% and 25% in PCR- and culture-positive samples. MG grows more easily compared to MS. The agreement value between the tests was 67%. Overall, flock wise prevalence was not much varied. The prevalence of mycoplasmosis was higher during winter. Our study confirmed that PCR is the most sensitive and reliable tool for the diagnosis of avian mycoplasmosis in field samples.

© 2018, Archives of Razi Institute. Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute.

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