Effect of Short-Term Maximal Exercise on Biochemical Markers of Muscle Damage, Total Antioxidant Status, and Homocysteine Levels in Football Players

AUTHORS

Omar Hammouda 1 , * , Hamdi Chtourou 1 , Anis Chaouachi 1 , Henda Chahed 2 , Salyma Ferchichi 2 , Choumous Kallel 3 , Karim Chamari 4 , Nizar Souissi 4

1 Research Laboratory 'Sport Performance Optimisation, National Center of Medicine and Science in Sport

2 Laboratory of Biochemistry, CHU Farhat Hached, Sousse, Tunisia

3 Laboratory of hematology, CHU Habib Bourguiba, Sfax, Tunisia

4 High Institute of Sport and Physical Education, Ksar-Sad, Manouba University, Tunisia

How to Cite: Hammouda O, Chtourou H, Chaouachi A, Chahed H, Ferchichi S, et al. Effect of Short-Term Maximal Exercise on Biochemical Markers of Muscle Damage, Total Antioxidant Status, and Homocysteine Levels in Football Players, Asian J Sports Med. Online ahead of Print ; 3(4):34544. doi: 10.5812/asjsm.34544.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Asian Journal of Sports Medicine: 3 (4); 239-246
Published Online: November 30, 2012
Article Type: Research Article
Received: March 20, 2012
Accepted: May 7, 2012
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Abstract

Purpose: Prolonged physical exercise results in transient elevations of biochemical markers of muscular damage. This study examined the effect of short-term maximal exercise on these markers, homocysteine levels (Hcy), and total antioxidant status (TAS) in trained subjects.

Methods: Eighteen male football players participated in this study. Blood samples were collected 5-min before and 3-min after a 30-s Wingate test.

Results: The results indicated that plasma biochemical markers of muscle injury increased significantly after the Wingate test (P<0.05). Moreover, significant increase of white blood Cells and their main subpopulations (i.e. monocytes, neutrophiles, and lymphocytes) (P<0.001) has been observed. Likewise, uric acid, total bilirubin, and TAS increased significantly after exercise (P<0.05). However, Hcy levels were unaffected by the Wingate test (for 3-min post-exercise measurement).

Conclusions: Short-term maximal exercise (e.g. 30-s Wingate test) is of sufficient intensity and duration to increase markers of muscle damage, and TAS; but not Hcy levels. Increases in the selected enzymes probably come primarily from muscle damage, rather than liver damage. Moreover, increase of TAS confirms the Wingate test induced oxidative stress.

© 2012, Author(s). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.

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