Today, although screening tests for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) are available, they are time-consuming and expensive; hence perform-ing tests that are cheaper but have higher sensi-tivity and specificity seems necessary. The aim of this study was to determine a cut off point of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) for screening GDM. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 200 pregnant women aged ≥25 years referring to a perinatal clinic were selected. Inclusion criteria re-quired having one of the following risk factors: His-tory of recurrent abortion, GDM, pre-eclampsia, macrosomia, still birth, or diabetes mellitus(DM) in first degree family or pre gestational body mass index ≥25kg/m2. All participants underwent a 50 g glucose challenge test (GCT) between the 24th and 28th gestational week. If 1-hour plasma glu-cose was over 130 mg/dL, a 3-hour 100g oral glu-cose tolerance test (OGTT) was recommended. The diagnosis of GDM was made based on ADA recommendations. Results: Of 200 participants, 65 women had posi-tive GCT, of which 58 (response rate 89%) were referred for 100g OGTT and 20 (10%) were di-agnosed with GDM. The under curve area for FPG of 0.85 and the FPG level of 91.5 mg/dL, showed highest sensitivity -80%, and specificity -92%, respectively in the diagnosis of GDM. Significant difference was observed between the GDM and normal groups for mean age, gravid-ity, parity and BMI (P<0.05). Conclusion: Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 91.5 mg/dL has good sensitivity and specificity in the screening of GDM; since this is simpler and cheaper than the 50g GCT, it is recommended as a screening method for the diagnosis of GDM.

"/> Today, although screening tests for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) are available, they are time-consuming and expensive; hence perform-ing tests that are cheaper but have higher sensi-tivity and specificity seems necessary. The aim of this study was to determine a cut off point of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) for screening GDM. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 200 pregnant women aged ≥25 years referring to a perinatal clinic were selected. Inclusion criteria re-quired having one of the following risk factors: His-tory of recurrent abortion, GDM, pre-eclampsia, macrosomia, still birth, or diabetes mellitus(DM) in first degree family or pre gestational body mass index ≥25kg/m2. All participants underwent a 50 g glucose challenge test (GCT) between the 24th and 28th gestational week. If 1-hour plasma glu-cose was over 130 mg/dL, a 3-hour 100g oral glu-cose tolerance test (OGTT) was recommended. The diagnosis of GDM was made based on ADA recommendations. Results: Of 200 participants, 65 women had posi-tive GCT, of which 58 (response rate 89%) were referred for 100g OGTT and 20 (10%) were di-agnosed with GDM. The under curve area for FPG of 0.85 and the FPG level of 91.5 mg/dL, showed highest sensitivity -80%, and specificity -92%, respectively in the diagnosis of GDM. Significant difference was observed between the GDM and normal groups for mean age, gravid-ity, parity and BMI (P<0.05). Conclusion: Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 91.5 mg/dL has good sensitivity and specificity in the screening of GDM; since this is simpler and cheaper than the 50g GCT, it is recommended as a screening method for the diagnosis of GDM.

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Diagnostic Value of Fasting Plasma Glucose in Screening of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

AUTHORS

Z Kashi 1 , * , SH Borzouei 2 , O Akha 2 , N Moslemizadeh 2 , HR Zakeri 2 , A Mohammad Poor 2 , R Banafti 2 , L Shahbaznezhad 2

1 Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Imam Khomeini Hospital, [email protected], I.R.Iran

2 Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Imam Khomeini Hospital, I.R.Iran

How to Cite: Kashi Z, Borzouei S, Akha O, Moslemizadeh N, Zakeri H, et al. Diagnostic Value of Fasting Plasma Glucose in Screening of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus, Int J Endocrinol Metab. Online ahead of Print ; 5(1):1-4.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism: 5 (1); 1-4
Article Type: Original Article
Received: June 6, 2006
Accepted: December 6, 2006
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Abstract

Today, although screening tests for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) are available, they are time-consuming and expensive; hence perform-ing tests that are cheaper but have higher sensi-tivity and specificity seems necessary. The aim of this study was to determine a cut off point of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) for screening GDM. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 200 pregnant women aged ≥25 years referring to a perinatal clinic were selected. Inclusion criteria re-quired having one of the following risk factors: His-tory of recurrent abortion, GDM, pre-eclampsia, macrosomia, still birth, or diabetes mellitus(DM) in first degree family or pre gestational body mass index ≥25kg/m2. All participants underwent a 50 g glucose challenge test (GCT) between the 24th and 28th gestational week. If 1-hour plasma glu-cose was over 130 mg/dL, a 3-hour 100g oral glu-cose tolerance test (OGTT) was recommended. The diagnosis of GDM was made based on ADA recommendations. Results: Of 200 participants, 65 women had posi-tive GCT, of which 58 (response rate 89%) were referred for 100g OGTT and 20 (10%) were di-agnosed with GDM. The under curve area for FPG of 0.85 and the FPG level of 91.5 mg/dL, showed highest sensitivity -80%, and specificity -92%, respectively in the diagnosis of GDM. Significant difference was observed between the GDM and normal groups for mean age, gravid-ity, parity and BMI (P<0.05). Conclusion: Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 91.5 mg/dL has good sensitivity and specificity in the screening of GDM; since this is simpler and cheaper than the 50g GCT, it is recommended as a screening method for the diagnosis of GDM.

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