Throughout the last two decades, significant advances have been made in oocyte cryopreservation and over 150 babies have been born from fertilized frozenthawed oocytes. Oocyte cryopreservation is analogous to semen cryopreservation for men. It is potentially the best way to preserve female fertility and offers important benefits to unmarried women or young girls at risk of losing ovarian function as a result of surgery or cancer chemotherapy, women who work with toxins or teratogens, and women who are concerned about age-related infertility. Many women today are involved with education or developing their careers and for majority of them, being married and having children may not be feasible until they are in their late 30s and early 40s. In all of these cases, oocyte cryopreservation may be an appropriate solution. On the other hand, cryopreserved oocytes of infertile couples that have completed their families could be an important source of oocyte donation to help other couples. In addition, oocyte cryopreservation presents an attractive alternative to embryo storge, which is often fraught with religious, ethical, and legal complications. While oocyte cryopreservation success has increased overtime, the pregnancy rates remain low and there is still concern about the safety of the procedure.

"/> Throughout the last two decades, significant advances have been made in oocyte cryopreservation and over 150 babies have been born from fertilized frozenthawed oocytes. Oocyte cryopreservation is analogous to semen cryopreservation for men. It is potentially the best way to preserve female fertility and offers important benefits to unmarried women or young girls at risk of losing ovarian function as a result of surgery or cancer chemotherapy, women who work with toxins or teratogens, and women who are concerned about age-related infertility. Many women today are involved with education or developing their careers and for majority of them, being married and having children may not be feasible until they are in their late 30s and early 40s. In all of these cases, oocyte cryopreservation may be an appropriate solution. On the other hand, cryopreserved oocytes of infertile couples that have completed their families could be an important source of oocyte donation to help other couples. In addition, oocyte cryopreservation presents an attractive alternative to embryo storge, which is often fraught with religious, ethical, and legal complications. While oocyte cryopreservation success has increased overtime, the pregnancy rates remain low and there is still concern about the safety of the procedure.

"/>

Human Oocyte Banking; Clinical Applications and Limitations

AUTHORS

Navid Esfandiari 1 , * , Z Nazemian 2 , F. Casper Robert 2

1 Toronto Centre for Advanced Reproductive Technology (TCART) and Division of Reproductive Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Toronto, [email protected], Canada

2 Toronto Centre for Advanced Reproductive Technology (TCART) and Division of Reproductive Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Toronto, Canada

How to Cite: Esfandiari N, Nazemian Z, Robert F C. Human Oocyte Banking; Clinical Applications and Limitations, Int J Endocrinol Metab. Online ahead of Print ; 4(4):216-223.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism: 4 (4); 216-223
Article Type: Review Article
Received: January 10, 2005
Accepted: November 18, 2005
READ FULL TEXT

Abstract

Throughout the last two decades, significant advances have been made in oocyte cryopreservation and over 150 babies have been born from fertilized frozenthawed oocytes. Oocyte cryopreservation is analogous to semen cryopreservation for men. It is potentially the best way to preserve female fertility and offers important benefits to unmarried women or young girls at risk of losing ovarian function as a result of surgery or cancer chemotherapy, women who work with toxins or teratogens, and women who are concerned about age-related infertility. Many women today are involved with education or developing their careers and for majority of them, being married and having children may not be feasible until they are in their late 30s and early 40s. In all of these cases, oocyte cryopreservation may be an appropriate solution. On the other hand, cryopreserved oocytes of infertile couples that have completed their families could be an important source of oocyte donation to help other couples. In addition, oocyte cryopreservation presents an attractive alternative to embryo storge, which is often fraught with religious, ethical, and legal complications. While oocyte cryopreservation success has increased overtime, the pregnancy rates remain low and there is still concern about the safety of the procedure.

Full Text

Full text is available in PDF

© 0, International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
COMMENTS

LEAVE A COMMENT HERE: