Ageing effects on the in vivo cyclic 3,5'adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production by the adrenal cortex were studied in the rat.

Materials and Methods: Eleven old (from 23 to 29 months) and 13 young (from 4 to 5 months), dexamethasone pre-treated Long-Evans female rats received 5.0 mu.i. (1-24) ACTH/lOOg b.w. by intravenous injection. The plasma concentration of corticosterone as well as the adrenal contents in cAMP and corticosterone were measured, by radioimmunoassay, just before and 45 min after the (1-24) ACTH injection.

Results: The basal plasma corticosterone level and the adrenal contents in corticosterone and cAMP were low and no group difference was observed. The (1-24) ACTH injection causes significant increases in the plasma corticosterone level and the glandular contents in corticosterone and cAMP, which were lesser in the old animals than in the young ones; the differences aged/young were approximately -37%, -18% and -55% respectively.

Conclusions: These results suggest that the reduced steroidogene response of the adrenal cortex in the old rat, to an acute ACTH administra-tion, is at least partly due to a decrease in the cellular production of the principal second messenger of this hormone, i.e. the cAMP.

"/> Ageing effects on the in vivo cyclic 3,5'adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production by the adrenal cortex were studied in the rat.

Materials and Methods: Eleven old (from 23 to 29 months) and 13 young (from 4 to 5 months), dexamethasone pre-treated Long-Evans female rats received 5.0 mu.i. (1-24) ACTH/lOOg b.w. by intravenous injection. The plasma concentration of corticosterone as well as the adrenal contents in cAMP and corticosterone were measured, by radioimmunoassay, just before and 45 min after the (1-24) ACTH injection.

Results: The basal plasma corticosterone level and the adrenal contents in corticosterone and cAMP were low and no group difference was observed. The (1-24) ACTH injection causes significant increases in the plasma corticosterone level and the glandular contents in corticosterone and cAMP, which were lesser in the old animals than in the young ones; the differences aged/young were approximately -37%, -18% and -55% respectively.

Conclusions: These results suggest that the reduced steroidogene response of the adrenal cortex in the old rat, to an acute ACTH administra-tion, is at least partly due to a decrease in the cellular production of the principal second messenger of this hormone, i.e. the cAMP.

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Age-Related Changes in the In Vivo Adrenocortical Production of cAMP and Corticosterone in Response to Exogenous ACTH in Long-Evans Female Rats

AUTHORS

A Ait Chaoui 1 , * , R Brudieux 2

1 Laboratoire de Physiologie Animale, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, [email protected], Morocco

2 Lab ora to ire d'Endocrinologie Comparee, Universite Bordeaux I, Av. des Facultes F3340S, France

How to Cite: Chaoui A, Brudieux R. Age-Related Changes in the In Vivo Adrenocortical Production of cAMP and Corticosterone in Response to Exogenous ACTH in Long-Evans Female Rats, Int J Endocrinol Metab. Online ahead of Print ; 3(2):93-98.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism: 3 (2); 93-98
Article Type: Original Article
Received: January 1, 2005
Accepted: May 1, 2005
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Abstract

Ageing effects on the in vivo cyclic 3,5'adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production by the adrenal cortex were studied in the rat.

Materials and Methods: Eleven old (from 23 to 29 months) and 13 young (from 4 to 5 months), dexamethasone pre-treated Long-Evans female rats received 5.0 mu.i. (1-24) ACTH/lOOg b.w. by intravenous injection. The plasma concentration of corticosterone as well as the adrenal contents in cAMP and corticosterone were measured, by radioimmunoassay, just before and 45 min after the (1-24) ACTH injection.

Results: The basal plasma corticosterone level and the adrenal contents in corticosterone and cAMP were low and no group difference was observed. The (1-24) ACTH injection causes significant increases in the plasma corticosterone level and the glandular contents in corticosterone and cAMP, which were lesser in the old animals than in the young ones; the differences aged/young were approximately -37%, -18% and -55% respectively.

Conclusions: These results suggest that the reduced steroidogene response of the adrenal cortex in the old rat, to an acute ACTH administra-tion, is at least partly due to a decrease in the cellular production of the principal second messenger of this hormone, i.e. the cAMP.

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