Exercise: A Free Medicine of All Time

AUTHORS

Faisal Muhammad ORCID 1 , 2 , *

1 Department of Public Health, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Daffodil International University, Dhaka, Bangladesh

2 Department of Social Work, School of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, University of Information Technology and Sciences, Dhaka, Bangladesh

How to Cite: Muhammad F. Exercise: A Free Medicine of All Time, Int J Sport Stud Hlth. Online ahead of Print ; 3(1):e104519. doi: 10.5812/intjssh.104519.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

International Journal of Sport Studies for Health: 3 (1); e104519
Published Online: June 16, 2020
Article Type: Letter
Received: June 8, 2020
Accepted: June 10, 2020
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Copyright © 2020, International Journal of Sport Studies for Health. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.

Dear Editor,

Exercise is good to the well-being of people. Older people are susceptible to numerous chronic diseases. From a cardiovascular health data it was discovered that people with the best exercise test scores were less likely to die within the next 30 years than their counterpart. A research stated that as little as 15 minutes of exercise almost daily can help to lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases (1-3). Another study reveals that the physical inactivity is the primary cause of most chronic diseases across the globe (2, 4). It was evident that regular exercise can improve the brain functions as well as physical and mental functions (5). Strong and consistent evidence reveals that exercise has a significant impact in preventing symptoms and reducing back pain (6). An overview research conducted in United Kingdom reveals that exercise may have specific benefits in reducing the severity of chronic pain (7). The eye health of more than 40,000 men and women runners has been reviewed over several years and they had significantly lower rates of eye diseases than the general public. Each year in the US thousands of people are diagnosed with colon cancer. Many studies found that those that engaged in high intensity activities were less likely to develop colon cancer than others that had minimal workouts (8).

A new study involving thousands participants found that people with high fitness during their middle age were significantly less likely to die from heart disease in later life. Professionals recommends that starting to exercise early in life and continuing to do it often could protect both the mental and physical health of patients battling depression and facing heart disease risks. According to new research taking up a daily run could lower heart disease risks by almost 56 percent, and working out could be particularly good medicine for those with depression (9). A study reported that a moderate-intensity activities are so vital to our own health and can reduce the risk of death in older women. Health professional should be suggesting exercise for older women, in addition to other conventional treatments. Many studies reveals that intensity activity can have mental and physical health benefits (10). Everyone should stay active in order to stay healthy.

Footnotes

References

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