Impact of Students’ Class Attendance on Recalling Previously Acquired Information

AUTHORS

Camellia Hemyari 1 , Kamiar Zomorodian 2 , Ali Sahraian 3 , Zahra Mardani 4 , Bahador Sarkari 5 , Nastaran Ahmadi 6 , *

1 PhD candidate of Clinical Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

2 Professor of Medical Mycology, Basic Research in Infectious Diseases Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

3 Professor of Psychiatry, Research Centre for Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

4 Student Research Committee, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

5 Professor of Immunoparasitology, Basic Research in Infectious Diseases Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

6 PhD candidate of Clinical Psychology, Yazd Cardiovascular Research Center, Afshar Hospital, Jomhouri Boulevard, Yazd, Iran

How to Cite: Hemyari C, Zomorodian K, Sahraian A , Mardani Z, Sarkari B, et al. Impact of Students’ Class Attendance on Recalling Previously Acquired Information, J Med Edu. 2017 ; 16(4):e105593. doi: 10.22037/jme.v16i4.17247.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Journal of Medical Education: 16 (4); e105593
Published Online: March 28, 2018
Article Type: Research Article
Received: May 30, 2017
Accepted: November 26, 2017
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Abstract

Background: In recent years, availability of class material including typed lectures, the professor’s Power Point slides, sound recordings, and even videos made a group of students feel that it is unnecessary to attend the classes. These students usually read and memorize typed lectures within two or three days prior to the exams and usually pass the tests even with low attendance rate. Thus, the question is how effective is this learning system and how long the one-night memorized lessons may last.Methods: A group of medical students (62 out of 106 students), with their class attendance and educational achievements in the Medical Mycology and Parasitology course being recorded since two years ago, was selected and their knowledge about this course was tested by multiple choice questions (MCQ) designed based on the previous lectures.Results: Although the mean re-exam score of the students at the end of the externship was lower than the corresponding final score, a significant association was found between the scores of the students in these two exams (r=0.48, P=0.01). Moreover, a significant negative association was predicted between the number of absences and re-exam scores (r=-0.26, P=0.037).Conclusion: As our findings show, the phenomenon of recalling the acquired lessons is preserved for a long period of time and it is associated with the students’ attendance. Many factors including generation effect (by taking notes) and cued-recall (via slide picture) might play a significant role in the better recalling of the learned information in students with good class attendance.

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  • © 2017, Journal of Medical Education. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
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