Residency Specialty Choice Trends Over 24 Years

AUTHORS

Hasan Khosravi 1 , * , Karyn Haitz 1 , Vinod E. Nambudiri 1

1 Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Department of Dermatology, Boston, MARedestium rentiendam fuiu effre igna

How to Cite: Khosravi H, Haitz K, Nambudiri V E. Residency Specialty Choice Trends Over 24 Years, J Med Edu. 2018 ; 17(2):e105618. doi: 10.22037/jme.v17i2.22178.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Journal of Medical Education: 17 (2); e105618
Published Online: November 26, 2018
Article Type: Brief Report
Received: July 17, 2018
Accepted: October 15, 2018
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Abstract

Studies have shown a decrease in the match rate in general medical and primary care-focused specialties among US medical school graduates and an increase in that of subspecialties with “controllable lifestyles.” We evaluated the percentage of Harvard Medical School graduates who matched into high-income controllable lifestyle, low-income controllable lifestyle, and noncontrollable lifestyle specialties from 1994 to 2017. Using linear regression, we found that the percentage of students matching into high-income and low-income controllable lifestyle specialties has increased over time, while those matching into noncontrollable lifestyle specialties – comprised largely of primary carefields – decreased. Such trends may impact the US physician workforce composition over time, with growth of residency positions into fields such as internal medicine exceeding the matriculation of U.S. medical graduates into these positions. We examine whether future policies should focus on incentivizing students to pursue such noncontrollable lifestyle specialties by highlighting controllable lifestyle elements within these fields and emphasizing alternative rewards which may attract candidates to these pursuits.

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  • © 2018, Journal of Medical Education. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
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