Background: Experience with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) resolution differs in different centers.
Objective:
The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiologic characteristics and outcome of VUR among Iranian children.
Patients and Methods:
In this cohort study, 1278 children with urinary tract infection (UTI) who were visited at the pediatric nephrology clinic; Tehran, IR Iran during 1999 to 2007 were studied. Following the diagnosis, patients received prophylactic low-dose oral antibiotic and one to two yearly follow-ups with Radionuclide Cystography (RNC). Patients underwent surgery in case of breakthrough infection or new renal scar formation.
Results:
Vesicoureteral reflux was found in 533 patients (42%) with a mean age of 6.3± 3.6 years (Range 2 days to 18 years), out of which 436 (82%) were females. During 3.3 ± 2.2 years follow-up, spontaneous resolution was observed in 109 (39%) of 279 patients with follow-up RNCs. Mean time to spontaneous resolution was 1.5 ± 1 years. Frequencies of VUR grades at initial investigation were 18%, 37%, 26%, 11% and 8% for grades I to V respectively, and 46% had bilateral VUR. Grades I to V resolved in 63%, 57%, 27%, 22% and 10%, respectively. Anti reflux surgery was performed in 27(10%) of patients. Two handred fourty nine patients proceeded to follow-up with Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan. There were 4 (4%) renal scars in patients with spontaneous resolution and 8 (5%) renal scars in patients without spontaneous resolution of VUR (P > 0.05).
Conclusions:
According to the excellent results with medical therapy, it is recommended that VUR grades 1 to 4 be managed medically with low-dose antibiotic prophylaxis and close follow-ups.
 

 


 

Implication for health policy/practice/research/medical education:
Due to importance of VUR in children that it can be progressed to CKD, this article will focus on the benefit of medical treatment and close follow-up of these patients.
Please cite this paper as:
Sharifian M, Boroujerdi HZ, Dalirani R, Maham S, Sepahi MA, Jahromy MH, et al. Spontaneous resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in Iranian children: A single center experience in 533 cases. Nephro-Urol Mon. 2011;3(3):191-195.
Article history:
Received: 30 Oct 2010
Revised: 18 Dec 2010
Accepted: 2 Jan 2011

"/>

Background: Experience with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) resolution differs in different centers.
Objective:
The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiologic characteristics and outcome of VUR among Iranian children.
Patients and Methods:
In this cohort study, 1278 children with urinary tract infection (UTI) who were visited at the pediatric nephrology clinic; Tehran, IR Iran during 1999 to 2007 were studied. Following the diagnosis, patients received prophylactic low-dose oral antibiotic and one to two yearly follow-ups with Radionuclide Cystography (RNC). Patients underwent surgery in case of breakthrough infection or new renal scar formation.
Results:
Vesicoureteral reflux was found in 533 patients (42%) with a mean age of 6.3± 3.6 years (Range 2 days to 18 years), out of which 436 (82%) were females. During 3.3 ± 2.2 years follow-up, spontaneous resolution was observed in 109 (39%) of 279 patients with follow-up RNCs. Mean time to spontaneous resolution was 1.5 ± 1 years. Frequencies of VUR grades at initial investigation were 18%, 37%, 26%, 11% and 8% for grades I to V respectively, and 46% had bilateral VUR. Grades I to V resolved in 63%, 57%, 27%, 22% and 10%, respectively. Anti reflux surgery was performed in 27(10%) of patients. Two handred fourty nine patients proceeded to follow-up with Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan. There were 4 (4%) renal scars in patients with spontaneous resolution and 8 (5%) renal scars in patients without spontaneous resolution of VUR (P > 0.05).
Conclusions:
According to the excellent results with medical therapy, it is recommended that VUR grades 1 to 4 be managed medically with low-dose antibiotic prophylaxis and close follow-ups.
 

 


 

Implication for health policy/practice/research/medical education:
Due to importance of VUR in children that it can be progressed to CKD, this article will focus on the benefit of medical treatment and close follow-up of these patients.
Please cite this paper as:
Sharifian M, Boroujerdi HZ, Dalirani R, Maham S, Sepahi MA, Jahromy MH, et al. Spontaneous resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in Iranian children: A single center experience in 533 cases. Nephro-Urol Mon. 2011;3(3):191-195.
Article history:
Received: 30 Oct 2010
Revised: 18 Dec 2010
Accepted: 2 Jan 2011

"/>

Spontaneous resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in Iranian children: A single center experience in 533 cases

AUTHORS

Mostafa Sharifian 1 , * , Hamed Zinsaz Boroujerdi 2 , Reza Dalirani 2 , Saeed Maham 2 , Mohsen Akhavan Sepahi 3 , Abdollah Karimi 4 , Maryam Ghaffari Shad 4 , Masoud Dadkhah Chymeh 4 , Maryam Sharifian 5

1 Pediatric Infections Research Center (PIRC), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, [email protected], IR Iran

2 Pediatric Infections Research Center (PIRC), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, IR.Iran

3 Department of Pediatrics, Qom University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, IR.Iran

4 Pediatric Infections Research Center (PIRC), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran

5 Department of Neurology, University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran

How to Cite: Sharifian M, Boroujerdi H, Dalirani R, Maham S, Sepahi M, et al. Spontaneous resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in Iranian children: A single center experience in 533 cases, Nephro-Urol Mon. Online ahead of Print ; 3(3):191-195.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Nephro-Urology Monthly: 3 (3); 191-195
Article Type: Research Article
Received: October 30, 2010
Accepted: January 2, 2011
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Abstract

Background: Experience with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) resolution differs in different centers.
Objective:
The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiologic characteristics and outcome of VUR among Iranian children.
Patients and Methods:
In this cohort study, 1278 children with urinary tract infection (UTI) who were visited at the pediatric nephrology clinic; Tehran, IR Iran during 1999 to 2007 were studied. Following the diagnosis, patients received prophylactic low-dose oral antibiotic and one to two yearly follow-ups with Radionuclide Cystography (RNC). Patients underwent surgery in case of breakthrough infection or new renal scar formation.
Results:
Vesicoureteral reflux was found in 533 patients (42%) with a mean age of 6.3± 3.6 years (Range 2 days to 18 years), out of which 436 (82%) were females. During 3.3 ± 2.2 years follow-up, spontaneous resolution was observed in 109 (39%) of 279 patients with follow-up RNCs. Mean time to spontaneous resolution was 1.5 ± 1 years. Frequencies of VUR grades at initial investigation were 18%, 37%, 26%, 11% and 8% for grades I to V respectively, and 46% had bilateral VUR. Grades I to V resolved in 63%, 57%, 27%, 22% and 10%, respectively. Anti reflux surgery was performed in 27(10%) of patients. Two handred fourty nine patients proceeded to follow-up with Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan. There were 4 (4%) renal scars in patients with spontaneous resolution and 8 (5%) renal scars in patients without spontaneous resolution of VUR (P > 0.05).
Conclusions:
According to the excellent results with medical therapy, it is recommended that VUR grades 1 to 4 be managed medically with low-dose antibiotic prophylaxis and close follow-ups.
 

 


 

Implication for health policy/practice/research/medical education:
Due to importance of VUR in children that it can be progressed to CKD, this article will focus on the benefit of medical treatment and close follow-up of these patients.
Please cite this paper as:
Sharifian M, Boroujerdi HZ, Dalirani R, Maham S, Sepahi MA, Jahromy MH, et al. Spontaneous resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in Iranian children: A single center experience in 533 cases. Nephro-Urol Mon. 2011;3(3):191-195.
Article history:
Received: 30 Oct 2010
Revised: 18 Dec 2010
Accepted: 2 Jan 2011

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