Background and Aims: Non-calculus presentations of hyperoxaluria (HX) and Hyperuricosuria (HU) are not common. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of symptomatic non-calculous idiopathic HX, HU and both of them with dysuria, failure to thrive (FTT), recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), dysmorphic RBCs, and abdominal pain in children.

Methods: A cross sectional study was done on 58 children who were age less than 14 years with history of persistent microscopic or macroscopic hematuria with HX and/or HU, regardless of having renal calculi, between October 2007 and October 2008. The patients were divided into three groups according to the type of crystalluria (I, 10 HX; II, 20 HU; and III, 28 HX+HU).

Results: The common presenting symptoms were abdominal pain (63%) and dysuria (45%). FTT was frequently occurred in female (68%). No significant relation was seen between the groups in terms of gender, macroscopic hematuria and recurrent UTI. We found that dysuria, positive family history, FTT, abdominal pain and dysmorphic RBCs in patients with HX were higher when compared to HU group. Moreover, logistic regression analysis showed the higher odds ratio of FTT, abdominal pain and dysmorphic RBCs in patients with HX+HU group when compared to individuals with HU.

Conclusion: Although our study showed that non calculus symptoms and signs of crystaluria such as dysmorphic RBCs, FTT, abdominal pain and dysuria are frequently seen in children with HX, but further studies are needed.

"/> Background and Aims: Non-calculus presentations of hyperoxaluria (HX) and Hyperuricosuria (HU) are not common. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of symptomatic non-calculous idiopathic HX, HU and both of them with dysuria, failure to thrive (FTT), recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), dysmorphic RBCs, and abdominal pain in children.

Methods: A cross sectional study was done on 58 children who were age less than 14 years with history of persistent microscopic or macroscopic hematuria with HX and/or HU, regardless of having renal calculi, between October 2007 and October 2008. The patients were divided into three groups according to the type of crystalluria (I, 10 HX; II, 20 HU; and III, 28 HX+HU).

Results: The common presenting symptoms were abdominal pain (63%) and dysuria (45%). FTT was frequently occurred in female (68%). No significant relation was seen between the groups in terms of gender, macroscopic hematuria and recurrent UTI. We found that dysuria, positive family history, FTT, abdominal pain and dysmorphic RBCs in patients with HX were higher when compared to HU group. Moreover, logistic regression analysis showed the higher odds ratio of FTT, abdominal pain and dysmorphic RBCs in patients with HX+HU group when compared to individuals with HU.

Conclusion: Although our study showed that non calculus symptoms and signs of crystaluria such as dysmorphic RBCs, FTT, abdominal pain and dysuria are frequently seen in children with HX, but further studies are needed.

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Non Calculus Signs and Symptoms of Hyperoxaluria and Hyperuricosuria in Children: A Single Experience

AUTHORS

Fatemeh Beiraghdar 1 , Yunes Panahi 2 , * , Abbas Madani 1 , Yunes Jahani 1

1 Nephrology & Urology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR.Iran

2 Research Center of Chemical Injury, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, [email protected], Tehran, IR.Iran

How to Cite: Beiraghdar F, Panahi Y, Madani A, Jahani Y. Non Calculus Signs and Symptoms of Hyperoxaluria and Hyperuricosuria in Children: A Single Experience, Nephro-Urol Mon. Online ahead of Print ; 1(2):137-142.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Nephro-Urology Monthly: 1 (2); 137-142
Article Type: Research Article
Received: May 3, 2009
Accepted: May 30, 2009
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Abstract

Background and Aims: Non-calculus presentations of hyperoxaluria (HX) and Hyperuricosuria (HU) are not common. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of symptomatic non-calculous idiopathic HX, HU and both of them with dysuria, failure to thrive (FTT), recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), dysmorphic RBCs, and abdominal pain in children.

Methods: A cross sectional study was done on 58 children who were age less than 14 years with history of persistent microscopic or macroscopic hematuria with HX and/or HU, regardless of having renal calculi, between October 2007 and October 2008. The patients were divided into three groups according to the type of crystalluria (I, 10 HX; II, 20 HU; and III, 28 HX+HU).

Results: The common presenting symptoms were abdominal pain (63%) and dysuria (45%). FTT was frequently occurred in female (68%). No significant relation was seen between the groups in terms of gender, macroscopic hematuria and recurrent UTI. We found that dysuria, positive family history, FTT, abdominal pain and dysmorphic RBCs in patients with HX were higher when compared to HU group. Moreover, logistic regression analysis showed the higher odds ratio of FTT, abdominal pain and dysmorphic RBCs in patients with HX+HU group when compared to individuals with HU.

Conclusion: Although our study showed that non calculus symptoms and signs of crystaluria such as dysmorphic RBCs, FTT, abdominal pain and dysuria are frequently seen in children with HX, but further studies are needed.

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