Soy Protein Intake, Cardiovascular Risks, CRP-Level and Kidney Function Among Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Nephropathy

AUTHORS

Leila Azadbakht 1 , * , Shahnaz Atabak 2 , Somayeh Rajaie 3 , Maryam Zahedi 4 , Masoomeh Tehrani 4 , Ahmad Esmaillzadeh 1

1 Associate professor of Nutrition, Food Security Research Center, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

2 Associate professor of Nutrition, Modarres hospital, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

3 MSc Student of Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

4 MSc Student of Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

How to Cite: Azadbakht L, Atabak S, Rajaie S, Zahedi M, Tehrani M, et al. Soy Protein Intake, Cardiovascular Risks, CRP-Level and Kidney Function Among Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Nephropathy, Zahedan J Res Med Sci. 2012 ; 14(2):e93577.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Zahedan Journal of Research in Medical Sciences: 14 (2); e93577
Published Online: September 19, 2011
Article Type: Research Article
Received: August 16, 2010
Accepted: September 09, 2010
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Abstract

Background: There are few reports regarding the effect of long-term soy protein consumption among type 2 diabetic patients with nephropathy. This study was conducted to elucidate the effects of soy consumption for a long period of time on cardiovascular risks, C-reactive protein (CRP) and kidney function indexes among type 2 diabetic patients with nephropathy.

Materials & Methods: This long-term randomized clinical trial was conducted among 41 type 2 diabetic patients with nephropathy (18 men and 23 women). Twenty patients in the soy protein group consumed a diet containing 0.8 g protein/kg body weight (35% animal proteins, 35% textured soy protein, and 30% vegetable proteins) and 21 patients in the control group consumed a similar diet containing 70% animal proteins and 30% vegetable proteins for 4 years.

Results: Soy protein consumption significantly improved cardiovascular risks such as fasting plasma glucose (mean change in the soy protein versus control groups: −18 ± 3 vs. 11 ± 2 mg/dl P = 0.03), total cholesterol (−23 ± 5 vs. 10 ± 3 mg/dl P = 0.01), LDL cholesterol (−20 ± 5 vs. 6 ± 2 mg/dl P = 0.01), triglyceride (−24 ± 6 vs. −5 ± 2 mg/dl P = 0.01) and serum CRP (1.31 ± 0.6 vs. 0.33 ± 0.1 mg/l P = 0.02) concentrations. Significant reductions were also seen in proteinuria (−0.15 ± 0.03 vs. 0.02 ± 0.01 g/day P = 0.001) and urinary creatinine (−1.5 ± 0.9 vs. 0.6 ± 0.3 mg/dl, P = 0.01) by consumption of soy protein.

Conclusion: Long-term soy protein consumption has beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors and kidney-related biomarkers among type 2 diabetic patients with nephropathy. [ZJRMS, 2012 14(2): 31-38]

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  • © 2012, Zahedan Journal of Research in Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
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